Say her name: November 20 is Transgender Day of Remembrance 


I wept the day I learned of Shade Schuler’s death. I’d never met her, hadn’t seen her picture until that morning, but I’d just finished the portraits of Lamia Beard, Ty Underwood, Jazmin Vash Payne, Taja de Jesus, Penny Proud, Bri Golec, Kristina Gomez Reinwald, London Chanel, Mercedes Williamson and India Clarke. The quick succession of portraits brought only sadness; death lingers heavily on the United States.

In just weeks, more names were added to the list of those destroyed: K.C. Haggard, Amber Monroe, Elisha Walker, Kandis Capri, Ashton O’Hara, Tamara Dominguez, Jasmine Collins, Keyshia Blige, Keisha Jenkins, and Zella Ziona.


Transgender women face a one in twelve chance of being murdered in the United States; Transgender women of color have a one in eight chance.


#SayHerName is a twenty-one piece set of 18 x 24 watercolor and ink portraits of Trans Women killed in the Untied States during 2015. Each piece is painted in reds and blues with negative white space as a dra- matic contrasting element. This red, white and blue color scheme reflects the citizenship of the women and the culture that produced their deaths. Paint is splattered across the pristine white of each page, representing the violence each woman faced. The backgrounds number their murders as reported (not the order that they occurred).


K. Ryan Henisey is a queer artist in Los Angeles. The art in his #ArtToEndViolence collection celebrates a passion for important and challenging social justice issues juxtaposed against a veneer of pop art. The superficiality of the genre draws attention to the violence perpetuated against communities marginalized by the dominant culture by forcing the viewer to confront what is meaningful. http://kryanhenisey.com
 

Keyshia Blige, Say Her Name

KeyshiaBligeKeyshia Blige is the 19th trans woman murdered this year in this United States. Her murder occurred in March but because she was misgendered by authorities and the media, she was not properly identified until August 2015. Though Blige’s murder is not being labeled a hate crime by law enforcement, her death (and the eighteen this year that precede her) points to the systemic problems of American Transphobia that often result in violence, suicide and death.

Transgender women face a one in twelve chance of being murdered in the United States; Transgender women have a one in eight chance.

#SayHerName is currently a 19 piece set of 18 x 24 watercolor and ink portraits of Trans Women killed in the Untied States during 2015. Each piece is painted in reds and blues with negative white space as a dramatic contrasting element. This red, white and blue color scheme reflects the citizenship of the women and the culture which produced their deaths. Paint is splattered across the pristine white of each page, representing the violence each woman faced. The backgrounds are listed in the number that their death was reported (not necessarily the order that they occurred).

#TransLivesMatterWeb

Beauty, Lost

#TransLivesMatterWeb

I wept the morning I learned of Shade Schuler’s death. I’d never met her, hadn’t seen her picture until that morning, but I’d just finished the portraits of Lamia Beard, Ty Underwood, Jazmin Vash Payne, Taja de Jesus, Penny Proud, Bri Golec, Kristina Gomez Reinwald, London Chanel, Mercedes Williamson and India Clarke. The quick succession of new portraits to paint brought only sadness; death lingers heavily on the United States. In just weeks, more names were added to the list of those destroyed through violence: K.C. Haggard, Amber Monroe, Elisha Walker, Kandis Capri, Ashton O’Hara, Tamara Dominguez, Jasmine Collins, and Keyshia Blige.

Transgender women face a one in twelve chance of being murdered in the United States; Transgender women have a one in eight chance.

#SayHerName is currently a 19 piece set of 18 x 24 watercolor and ink portraits of Trans Women killed in the Untied States during 2015. Each piece is painted in reds and blues with negative white space as a dramatic contrasting element. This red, white and blue color scheme reflects the citizenship of the women and the culture which produced their deaths. Paint is splattered across the pristine white of each page, representing the violence each woman faced. The backgrounds are listed in the number that their death was reported (not necessarily the order that they occurred).
JazminVashPayne TajadeJesus PennyProud BriGolec LondonChanel

Ghosts of Loss

Orange County Creatives Gallery, Summer
Orange County Creatives Gallery, Summer

 

“When you’re a kid, parents always tell you sticks and stones may break your bones but names will never hurt you. To me that’s not true. Words hurt, and words turn up to threats and threats turn up to physical violence.” Taylor Alesana, like many transgender teens, was made to feel uncomfortable at school and in society. She spoke about it on her popular YouTube channel before taking her life on April 2, 2015.

Taylor was 16.

Transgender Americans face some of the worst examples of discrimination and violence in our nation. It is widely reported that nearly 45% of all transgender individuals have attempted suicide (although accurate rates may be much higher when accounting for those who may have lived in secret).

We can all do better. We can be accepting and kind to people of all genders. We can demand that conversion therapy be outlawed and deemed abuse. We can demand equal protections for ALL peoples.

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#ARTTOENDVIOLENCE

#TransLivesMatter

 

It’s for the Thousands

“If you want to call me names, make jokes and doubt my intentions, go ahead because the reality is I can take it. But for thousands of kids out there coming to terms with the reality of who they are they shouldn’t have to take it.” – Caitlyn Jenner

#TranslivesMatter
#TranslivesMatter

Once again, Caitlyn embodies what it means to be courageous. Thank you, Caitlyn Jenner for shining a light into the shadowy places of our society.

Transgender Americans face some of the worst examples of discrimination and violence in our nation. It is widely reported that nearly 40% of all transgender individuals have attempted suicide (although accurate rates may be much higher when accounting for those who may have lived in secret).

#TransLivesMatter is a mixed media piece, transparent watercolor, wax, and marker on 140lb paper. The painting is the fourth piece in the collection #ArttoEndViolence and depicts  the ghostly remembrances of Blake Brickington, Taylor Alesana, and Leelah Alcorn.

We can all do better. We can be accepting and kind to people of all genders. We can demand that conversion therapy be outlawed and deemed abuse. We can demand equal protections for ALL peoples.

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Ash Haffner, a 16 year old trans boy, took his life earlier this year after a lifetime of bullying. He was the fourth transgender teen to commit suicide this year. Line drawn portraits of him, Taylor Alesana and portraits of Leelah Alcorn are currently on display at Orange County Creatives Gallery.