Kimani Gray at Viral: 25 Years from Rodney King 

Kimani Gray
Prints from four of my #ArttoEndViolence pieces are included in Viral: RK25. The show, opening Saturday, April 9, 2016, features artwork that documents police brutality in the 25 years since Rodney King. 

The Durón Gallery Space, SPARC, 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA. 

  
On March 9, 2013, Kimani Gray was shot and killed by two plainclothes police officers. Kimani, affectionately called Kiki, was struck by seven bullets, three of which entered through his back. He was heard to cry the words, “don’t let me die.”

Controversy surrounding the event led to mini riots in New York neighborhoods and highlighted the growing tension between African American communities and law enforcement in the US.

There is no database for crimes committed by law enforcement against the people. This lack of data echoes Jim Crow, for it is the very function of government to ensure the safety of all its citizens. There is no oversight. The very agencies that may have committed crimes against American communities are solely responsible for the investigation and reporting of such crimes.

No indictment was made after the shooting of Kimani Gray.

He was 16 years old. This occurred in Brooklyn, New York.

Hands up. Don’t shoot.

Kimani Gray, #BlueHolocaust

Detail, #Blue Holocaust; Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
Detail, #Blue Holocaust;
Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
On March 9, 2013, Kimani Gray was shot and killed by two plainclothes police officers. Kimani, affectionately called Kiki, was struck by seven bullets, three of which entered through his back. He was heard to cry the words, “don’t let me die.”

Controversy surrounding the event led to mini riots in New York neighborhoods and highlighted the growing tension between African American communities and law enforcement in the US.

There is no database for crimes committed by law enforcement against the people. This lack of data echoes Jim Crow, for it is the very function of government to ensure the safety of all its citizens. There is no oversight. The very agencies that may have committed crimes against American communities are solely responsible for the investigation and reporting of such crimes.

No indictment was made after the shooting of Kimani Gray.

He was 16 years old. This occurred in Brooklyn, New York.

Hands up. Don’t shoot.
_
#BlueHolocaust is currently at the the Kellogg University Gallery for the 41st annual Ink & Clay Juried Exhibition. The show opens September 19. The Opening Reception is Saturday, September 26 from 4-7pm. I hope to see you there. #BlueHolocaust is a controversial piece that conflates the Holocaust with the systemic deaths of African American children in the United States at the hands of Law Enforcement. It is the second piece in #ArtToEndViolence.

FineArt

DeAunta Terrel Farrow, #BlueHolocaust

Detail, #Blue Holocaust;  Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
Detail, #Blue Holocaust;
Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015

Silver stars on emblazoned shields promise protection, for some. When children such as DeAunta Terrel Farrow are gunned down for carrying a toy gun in their neighborhood (June 22, 2007, West Memphis, Arkansas) the disparity between white privilege and black reality becomes apparent: one mother teaching their child to go to the police, the other teaching him to avoid.

A blue holocaust is slowly devouring America’s children. Where blackness is a frightening assault to some who enforce the law, there will always be an imminent danger to the community. For when those who enforce the law break it, they weaken their relationship with the public. How many black boys lay dead in New World soil? We’ll never know. But we can change what was and build a better world. We can demand accountability. We can demand cameras on officers. We can prevent violence.

Hands up. Don’t shoot.

Tamir Rice, #BlueHolocaust

Detail, #Blue Holocaust;  Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
Detail, #Blue Holocaust;
Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
When they come, black booted and their sirens blazing, the community shuts its doors and draws its curtains tight. To the neighborhood, emergency sounds mean another black boy may die tonight.

On November 22, 2014, Tamir Rice was shot and killed by two police officers.

Tamir was in a park, with his toy gun. When the call was made to emergency services, Tamir was described as “a male sitting on a swing and pointing a gun at people,” “probably a juvenile.” Tamir was fired upon twice, fatally struck once in the torso. The investigation into Tamir’s death is ongoing but failures of justice and controversy surrounding police-involved deaths of other African American children  has caused unrest in neighborhoods throughout the United States.

Tamir was 12 years old. This occurred in Cleveland, Ohio.

Hands up. Don’t shoot.

#ArtToEndViolence is a series of paintings, watercolor and mixed media, dedicated to highlighting the violence experienced by Trans, Gay, and Black citizens within the United States. #BlueHolocaust, of which Kimani is a piece, is available through Orange County Creatives Gallery in Laguna Beach. The titular piece to the series recently won an Award of Excellence in Fine Art at The California State Fair. Pieces from the collection have appeared and are available in Los Angeles, Long Beach, Laguna Beach and Sacramento. #BlueHolocaust is also part of [AR]t Walk Long Beach, an Augmented Reality Event, Summer 2015.

FineArt

Kimani Gray, #BlueHolocaust

Detail, #Blue Holocaust;  Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
Detail, #Blue Holocaust;
Orange County Creatives Gallery, In the Neighborhood, Juried Competition, Summer 2015 | Long Beach [AR]t Walk, Summer 2015
On March 9, 2013, Kimani Gray was shot and killed by two plainclothes police officers. Kimani, affectionately called Kiki, was struck by seven bullets, three of which entered through his back. He was heard to cry the words, “don’t let me die.”

Controversy surrounding the event led to mini riots in New York neighborhoods and highlighted the growing tension between African American communities and law enforcement in the US.

There is no database for crimes committed by law enforcement against the people. This lack of data echoes Jim Crow, for it is the very function of government to ensure the safety of all its citizens. There is no oversight. The very agencies that may have committed crimes against American communities are solely responsible for the investigation and reporting of such crimes.

No indictment was made after the shooting of Kimani Gray.

He was 16 years old. This occurred in Brooklyn, New York.

Hands up. Don’t shoot.
#ArtToEndViolence is a series of paintings, watercolor and mixed media, dedicated to highlighting the violence experienced by Trans, Gay, and Black citizens within the United States. #BlueHolocaust, of which Kimani is a piece, is available through Orange County Creatives Gallery in Laguna Beach. The titular piece to the series recently won an Award of Excellence in Fine Art at The California State Fair. Pieces from the collection have appeared and are available in Los Angeles, Long Beach, Laguna Beach and Sacramento. #BlueHolocaust is also part of [AR]t Walk Long Beach, an Augmented Reality Event, Summer 2015.

FineArt